February 11, 2016

BACtrack Data Reveals Average BAC Level at 0.08% During Super Bowl 50

BACtrack Data Provides Insight About Super Bowl Alcohol Consumption

We've just released our latest BACtrack Consumption report exploring average BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) levels during Super Bowl 50. We were curious, when would BAC levels rise and peak, would the score of the game impact the average BAC, and which fans would have the highest BAC?

We analyzed data points from unique BAC tests collected anonymously from users of BACtrack’s award-winning BACtrack Mobile and BACtrack Vio smartphone breathalyzers.

The key finding: People drank a lot and drank continuously throughout the game. 

Notable insights are below and be sure to see the full results right here on our site. Also, take a look at the BAC testing conducted the week leading up to the game in San Francisco, our headquarters, and the host city for the Super Bowl. With assistance from 'BACtrack Referees,' we were at Super Bowl fan events and pre-game parties to offer free BAC testing and help fans drink smarter.

Super Bowl 50 - BACtrack Consumption Report Highlights

The Big Game Equates to Big Drinking

  • BAC levels during Super Bowl game time (3:00 PM to 8:00 PM PST) averaged .079%
    • Super Bowl Sunday 2015 BAC levels averaged only .057%
    • The average BAC level for non-holiday Sundays in 2015 was 0.053%; game time average BAC is 50 percent higher
    • During the game, Carolina Panther fans (0.080%) had higher average BAC levels than Denver Bronco fans (0.062%)

    Fans’ BAC Levels Started High and Peaked in Q4

    • Pre-game average BAC (11:00 AM to 2:00 PM PST) was 0.039% and increased to 0.072% by 3:00 PM
    • Average BAC peaked at 0.084% by the end of Q4, and the Broncos were the champs
    • Average BAC post-game (9:00 PM PST) was still high at 0.075%

    Our best guess for the higher than expected average BAC: With a defense-oriented match up, and commercials considered less exciting than years past, Super Bowl fans took to drinking earlier. Less action means more drinking. 

    What do you think? Tell us in the comments section below.

    See the full report here, and check out our local results and photo gallery


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